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OTHER RESOURCES

In addition to this, they have been widely published and a selection of their material can be reviewed below

• Books
• Published journal articles

• Case studies
• Mainstream media

 

Tuesday
Aug212012

BOOKS

UNDERSTANDING FAMILY ENTERPRISE: A Book of Readings
by Ken Moores & Justin B. Craig (2011) Bond University Press.

The papers in this collection are presented within a framework that has emerged from our research over the years. This framework is the basis of our understanding the why, the what, and the how by which family firms can achieve a distinct advantage over more widely‐held companies. The features that differentiate family controlled businesses (FCBs) from non‐family businesses (NFBs) are discussed in terms of their Architecture (strategy inspired structures and systems), their Governance (Family and Business), their Entrepreneurship (Leadership and Strategy), and their Stewardship (Individual and Family).

 

Women in Family Business Leadership Roles: Daughters on the Stage
by Ken Moores and Mary Barrett  (2009) Edward Elgar Publishing, UK. 

 

The book is based on case studies of 13 women and their family firms, drawn from English-speaking and non-English speaking countries. The women leaders display a range of different types of involvement with their family firms, from CEOs of firms which are family firms ‘by intent’, to second or later generation female successors to formal leadership or other influential roles in firms started by male or female forebears. The cases include examples of women who, in their own estimation, have not reached a position of leadership as well as those who have attained this.

 

Learning Family Business: Paradoxes and Pathways
by Ken Moores and Mary Barrett (2002) Ashgate Publishing Limited, UK. Reprinted (2010) Bond University Press
Translated into Korean (2011) Hanui Publishing Group

 

In this book we explain the ways the ‘different’, even paradoxical, nature of family businesses affects how their aspiring leaders set out to learn how to manage them and the strategic choices they make in the process of trying to ensure their firms survive and grow. We have tried to see how recognising and thus ‘framing’ the paradoxes of family business which appear at various stages of both learning family firms can help in exploring, understanding and, perhaps, managing them.

 

Monday
Sep102012

Professionalising and Reporting

Research on accounting in family firms: past accomplishments and future challenges
(2010) Family Business Review 23(3)
Salvato, C., & Moores, Ken

In this article we first assess accounting areas in which the “family entity” plays a distinct role and elaborate on important characteristics of these phenomena. We also report evidence suggesting that additional research efforts may illuminate both unresolved issues in the accounting literature and so-far-neglected dimensions of the family business entity. Finally, we examine several different avenues for research at the accounting—family business interface and identify common themes among them.

Strategically Aligning Family and Business using the Balanced Scorecard (2010) Journal of Family Business Strategy 1 (2)
Craig, J. B., & Moores, Ken

We take an integrated approach to align issues that influence the family and business systems. We illustrate how the Balanced Scorecard can be introduced and used to assist family members, board members and management in a third-generation Australian family-owned business. The process of scorecard development is discussed and the development of the core essence, vision and mission statements, strategic objectives, measures and targets, which can be scrutinized by family business stakeholders to ascertain consistency with the vision of the company, is outlined. We suggest that, in the family domain, the BSC assists in the education of, and communication among, family members. From a business system perspective, the BSC is a useful tool to link and align the family with the business, and this too has benefits in communication and education terms. 

Spotlights and shadows: Preliminary findings about the experiences of women in family business leadership roles (2009) Journal of Management and Organization 15(3)
Barrett, M., & Moores, Ken

This study focuses on women in FCBs to better understand how they exercise leadership and entrepreneurship in the family firm context. Case study analysis of an international sample of women FCB leaders, suggest there are some characteristic ways women leaders learn FCB leadership and entrepreneurship roles. We have tentatively labelled them stumbling into the spotlight, building your own stage, directing the spotlight elsewhere, and coping with shadows. 

Balanced scorecards to drive the strategic planning of family firms.
(2005) Family Business Review, XVIII(2), 105-122.
Craig, J. B., & Moores, Ken

The focus of this research is the measurement and management tool known as the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) and how it can be applied in the family business context. In this article we add familiness to the four BSC perspectives (financial, innovation and learning, customer, internal process) and illustrate how this can assist business development, management, and succession planning in family-owned businesses. We use an action research project to highlight how family businesses can professionalise their management by the adoption of a BSC strategy map that includes a family business focus and links the core essence of the family business with the values and the vision of the founder to the strategic initiatives of the family business. * This paper registered as the sixth most downloaded paper on Blackwell Synergy - Family Business Review in 2006

How Australia’s Dennis Family Corporation professionalized its family business. (2002) Family Business Review, March, XV(1), 59-70.
Craig, J. B., & Moores, Ken

This paper examines a second-generation family business that recently introduced professional corporate governance structures to its organisation. The paper includes an outline of the company and an in-depth interview with the second-generation family member who was responsible for the process. Advice to those who are considering corporate governance changes to their family business appears throughout the interview.

The Salience of Market, Bureaucratic, and Clan Controls in the Management of Family Firm Transitions: Some Tentative Australian Evidence. (2000) Family Business Review. 13 (2), 91–106.
Moores, Ken & Mula, Joseph

This paper reports some of the results from a nationwide study of Australian family-owned businesses that sought to ascertain and understand their management and control practices. In particular, the paper assesses the organisational transitions of Australian family firms in terms of their dominant control practices. These control measures are evaluated according to Ouchi’s classification of market, bureaucratic, and clan controls. The salience of these different forms of control serves to identify distinctive patterns that define periods of organisational passage (life cycles).

* This paper won the best research paper at World Family Business Network Conference 1995

Monday
Sep102012

Performance and Productivity

Firm ownership and productivity: a study of family and non-family SMEs(2011) Journal of Small Business Economics.
Francesco Barbera & Ken Moores

The objective of this paper is to reveal whether family firms are more or less productive than non-family firms. We provide empirical evidence that family labour and capital indeed yield iverse output contributions compared with their non-family counterparts. In particular, family labour output contributions are significantly higher, and family capital output contributions significantly lower. Interestingly, differences in total factor productivity between family and non-family firms disappear when we allow for heterogeneous output contributions of family production inputs. These findings imply that the assumption of homogeneous labour and capital between family and non-family firms is inappropriate when estimating the production function

A ten year investigation of strategy, systems and environment upon innovation in family firms. (2006) Family Business Review, 19(1), 1-10.
Craig, J. B., Cassar, G., & Moores, Ken

This article studies innovation in family firms.. The research addresses the idea of shifting leadership, different mechanisms of facilitating communication, and the importance to the firm of technical progress, linking each to innovation. Shifting leadership is addressed through the longitudinal design. Communication mechanisms are monitored through (i) scope of information and (2) timeliness of information. Technical progress is included in an environmental uncertainty factor techno-economic uncertainty. The findings suggest that linkages between established family firms and innovation may be substantially stronger than currently assumed by many.

* This paper registered as the sixth most downloaded paper on Blackwell Synergy - Family Business Review in 2007

Monday
Sep102012

Policy

Championing Family Business Issues to Influence Public Policy: Evidence from Australia (2010) Family Business Review 23 (2)
Craig, J. B., & Moores, Ken

This paper proposes a strategy for the family firm sector to gain the attention of policy makers. The strategy builds through influencing social expectations, creating political issues, developing legislative actions which are subsequently implemented and regulated. To achieve this, we suggest that the family business sector must achieve salience as a community’s definitive stakeholders in which capacity they possess, or are perceived to possess, attributes of power, legitimacy and urgency.

 

Monday
Sep102012

The Field of Family Business

Clarifying the strategic advantage of familiness: 
Unbundling its dimensions and highlighting its paradoxes. (2010) Journal of Family Business Strategy 1(3)
Irava, W., & Moores, Ken.

We clarify “familiness” by identifying the dimensions of this unique family business resource in multigenerational family firms. Using data from four in-depth case studies, we provide evidence that “familiness” is comprised of human resources (reputation and experience), organisational resources (decision-making and learning), and process resources (relationships and networks). Furthermore, we demonstrate how these resource dimensions are paradoxical in nature in that each influences the family firm in both positive and negative ways. 

Family business research at a tipping point threshold (2009) Journal of Management and Organization 15(3)
Craig, J. B., Howorth, C., Moores, Ken, & Poutziouris, P.

In this paper, we report the frequency that family business research has been published by year and by discipline in top-tier journals as listed in the Journal Quality List (JQL) (Harzing 2008) to argue that family business research has reached a tipping point threshold. We suggest that the acceptance of family business research in top-tier journals is the tipping point that will enamour the field to a wider researcher audience and thereby further contribute to paradigmatic development.

Family business: A rich research repository
(2009) Journal of Management and Organization 15(3)
Craig, J. B., Moores, Ken, Howorth, C., & Poutziouris, P.

This article serves as the epilogue to the Family Business Special Issue of the Journal of Management and Organization in July 2009. Key issues raised in the special issue are highlighted; most significantly the growth and internationalisation of family business research, such that it has reached a ‘tipping point’, encouraging scholars from all disciplines to contribute to the growing body that is family business research.

Research Family Business: An interview with Danny Miller (2009) Journal of Management and Organization 15(3)
Moores, Ken.

In 2005 Danny Miller and Isabelle Le Breton Miller published Managing for the Long Run: Lessons in Competitive Advantage from Great Family Businesses which together with a series of articles have had a significant impact on scholarship in the field of family business. Here we explore with Danny his motivations for entering this emergent field and seek his insights for those wanting to follow his lead into family business research. Specifically Danny answers the why, what, and how of his entry into family business research: why he was motivated to move to the field, what he found and focused on, and how he sought to make contributions to the broad areas of management and organizations from the context of family business.

Paradigms and theory building in the domain of business families.
(2009) Family Business Review, 22(2), 167-180. 
Moores, Ken

This article argues the bona fides of the study of family business as a standalone discipline. Using a widely accepted evolutionary process for the development of scientific disciplines and an established theory-building methodology, the author introduces a theoretically robust explanation of the domain of business families. Established theories widely acknowledged as having relevance to business families are meshed with the universally accepted three-circle Venn diagram-based paradigm to illustrate both the stage of the discipline in theory building terms and an evolutionary path to further develop a theory of the business family domain.

Balanced scorecards to drive the strategic planning of family firms.

Thursday
Sep132012

Case Studies

From vision to variables: A scorecard to continue the professionalisation of a family firm. Family Business Research Handbook. Elgar Publications, 196-214. (2006)
Moores, Ken & Craig, J. B.

This chapter builds on previous projects we have conducted that have concentrated on the key areas of corporate governance and strategic planning in family businesses. Tthis research takes on an integrated approach and seeks to integrate issues that influence the family and business systems. Specifically, in this research we use innovation action research (Kaplan, 1998) to illustrate how the Balanced Scorecard that includes reference to family business challenges has been introduced and used to assist family members, board members and management in a third-generation Australian family-owned business by the lead author who is a non-executive director of the business. The process of scorecard development is discussed and the development of the core essence, vision and mission statements, strategic objectives, measures and targets, which can be scrutinised by family business stakeholders to ascertain consistency with the vision of the company, is outlined. 

The professionalisation process: The Dennis Family Corporation case.
Family Business Case Journal,(Eds. Joe Astrachan, Panikkos Poutziouris and Khaled Soufani) (2004) ISBN: 0-9753893-0-0, 91-121.
Craig, J. B., & Moores, Ken

Bert and Dawn Dennis were faced with a decision that had to be made and they could not make it on their own. They called a family meeting. They asked their four adult off-spring to decide whether they would prefer them to sell the business that they had built over the past 25 years and divide the funds equally between them or whether the children would prefer to amalgamate their associated businesses with the parent company and take on the challenge of professionalising this new entity. The four members of the second generation expressed unanimous desire to amalgamate and “make a real go of it”. This case study details how the Dennis family has been able to professionalise their family business while still retaining their family values and realising Bert and Dawn’s vision.

The Challenge of father-daughter succession in family business: a case study from the land down under.
Chapter 27 in Family Father-Daughter Succession in Family Business: A cross-cultural perspective  edited by Halkias, Daphne, Thurman, Paul, W., Smith, Celina, and Nason, Robert S., (2011) Gower Publishing Ltd., p285-293.
Barrett, Mary & Moores, Ken

This chapter examines the case of an Australian woman who succeeded her father as the CEO of a large fourth generation family business in the traditionally male-dominated road transport industry. The case is described in three phases 91) an outline of Australian culture and how it influences business life, (2) the history of the case family firm and how the daughter came to lead it, and (3) conclusions are drawn they relate to the Australian values and culture.

The Deague family: learning entrepreneurship through osmosis

Chapter 7 in Family Enterprise in the Asia-Pacific :exploring transgenerational entrepreneurship in Family Firms edited by Au, Kevin, Craig, Justin B., and Ramachandran, Kavil (2100) Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., p111-123

Craig, Justin, Irava, Wayne and Moores, Ken

The Belcher family gain legitimacy in a new industry: sailing into the unknown

Chapter 8 in Family Enterprise in the Asia-Pacific :exploring transgenerational entrepreneurship in Family Firms edited by Au, Kevin, Craig, Justin B., and Ramachandran, Kavil (2100) Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., p124-136

Craig, Justin, Irava, Wayne and Moores, Ken

Twin Brothers in arms learn the family business

Chapter 10 in Family Enterprise in the Asia-Pacific :exploring transgenerational entrepreneurship in Family Firms edited by Au, Kevin, Craig, Justin B., and Ramachandran, Kavil (2100) Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., p150-163

Craig, Justin, Irava, Wayne and Moores, Ken

Wednesday
Sep192012

Mainstream Media